iSoul In the beginning is reality

An introduction to co-physics, part 1

In order to keep things as simple as possible, I’m starting to name the dual to standard physics with the prefix “co-“, so that co-physics, co-mechanics, co-speed, co-velocity, etc. refer to their dual terms. Like tangent and cotangent, there is an inverse relationship between physics and co-physics. Here is the beginning to a systematic presentation of this dual physics, starting with classical mechanics.

The simplest mechanics concerns a point object with finite but negligible mass, called a particle. A particle is described by its position in space, which may vary in a time series. Dually, a co-particle is described by its position in time, which may vary over a series of places, i.e., over a path or route. A particle might not change its position in space but it must exist over multiple positions in a time series. Similarly, a co-particle might not change its position in time but it must exist over multiple positions in a series of places.

Note: This is an unusual perspective, but it will make more sense as we go along. Have patience.

The definition of speed is, “The time rate of change of position of a body in space without regard to direction; in other words, the magnitude of the velocity vector.” (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Physics, 3rd edition, used throughout with slight modification). Implicit in this definition is that there must be a non-zero change in a time series, which is nominally the unit in the denominator, e.g., “metres per second” refers to the spatial change in metres over one second of a time series.

The definition of co-speed or pace then is “The space rate of change of position of a body in time without regard to direction; in other words, the magnitude of the co-velocity vector.” Implicit in this definition is that there must be a non-zero change in a place series, which is nominally the unit in the denominator, e.g., “seconds per metre” refers to the temporal change in seconds over one metre of a place series.

The definition of velocity is, “The time rate of change of position of a body in space; it is a vector quantity, having direction as well as magnitude.” The definition of co-velocity is, “The space rate of change of position of a body; it is a vector quantity, having co-direction as well as magnitude.”

Direction in space is based on distance and co-direction is based on duration using triangles and trigonometry. If light or anything with a constant speed is used to measure both distance and duration, then these directions will be equivalent. But otherwise they may be different, for example with travel on city streets.

The definition of acceleration is, “The rate of change of velocity with respect to a time series.” The units are, e.g., metres per second per second. Similarly, the definition of co-acceleration is, “The rate of change of co-velocity with respect to a place series.” The units are, e.g., seconds per metre per metre.

Terminology for space and time, part 1

There are several senses of the words space and time that need to be carefully distinguished in order to avoid confusion. Let’s start with natural philosophy in the tradition of Aristotle:

Space is “the feature of physical being according to which each such being can be identified as occupying a place — and, as such, can be located and measured in relation to other such beings.” (John W. Carlson, Words of Wisdom: A Philosophical Dictionary for the Perennial Tradition)

The author notes that this conception of space is different from the idealized expanse of early modern science. It is a more relational conception of space, which fits better with the relativisitic manifolds of late modern physics.

The same author defines time this way: “a measure of the physically changing as such, numbered as to before and after.” This would be called a “B-series” in the philosopher John McTaggart’s terminology: a static, tenseless series of events in before-after relationship. An “A-series” is a time series from past events to what’s happening now, on to future events. This is a dynamic, tensed conception of time.

Either way, time is considered a series or a location in a series (as in a point in time), whereas space is considered a place or a locus of places (as in the definition of a circle as the locus of points equidistant from a point). However, this obscures how a route through space is a series of points that have a before and after, similar to time. It also obscures how places in time can be in different directions from one another.

To keep all this straight, I suggest speaking of a time series for a serial conception of time (whether A or B series). The corresponding term for space would be a place series, which is similar to a world line in spacetime. A locus of points in time, not necessarily in a single series, could be called a chronus of points in time. The corresponding term for spacetime is a manifold.

We think of physical objects as having spatial properties but they also have temporal properties — e.g., they are constructed, used, wear out, fall apart. So the word object should not be considered merely something with spatial extent. The length of an object in space corresponds to the length of time of an event (or the length of an event in time), and the distance between objects in space corresponds to the duration between events in time or between the beginning and ending of one or more events.

In a time series one may speak of going forward or back in time but this should not be considered as reversing the chain of causality. It is either considering a time series in the opposite direction (i.e., a change of perspective) or taking a return trip along the same route. The term “time travel” should be avoided.

Direction and units of magnitude

I want to clarify the statement in the previous post that “the three dimensions of direction are the same for space and time”. I have made the point that vectors in physics have various units of magnitude but direction is the same for all of them. That is accurate in the sense that directionality is the same concept in all cases. But that does not mean that the particular directions are necessarily the same. They are not.

Here’s a simple example: if someone travels 10 miles east in 17 minutes, then 17 miles north in 10 minutes, the distance direction will be about 60 degrees northeast but the duration direction will be about 30 degrees. Their directions are different but east and north are the same in both cases. This is no different than vectors with other units (velocity, acceleration, etc.). We don’t notice these other differences because we almost always relate them to an underlying distance space.

Multidimensional time has its own “space” as it were, even if directionality is the same concept. That’s why mapping the travel time between cities as map distances proportional to durations results in a “distorted” map. We’re so used to a distance map that anything else looks distorted. But if travel time is more important to us than travel distance (as it often is), a map of travel times is more useful.

Six dimensional spacetime

First consider the dual to Minkowski spacetime. Recall that the invariant interval of Minkowski spacetime has one dimension of time with three dimensions of space:

(ds)² = (c dt)² – (dx1)² – (dx2)² – (dx3)² = (c dt)² – (dr

where t is the time coordinate and x1, x2, and x3 are space coordinates of r.

This could be called temporal spacetime since speeds and other ratios are referenced to duration, i.e., they have units of time in the denominator. The dual could be called spatial spacetime since measures of movement are referenced to distance, i.e., they have units of length in the denominator. In that case the dual invariant interval is:

(ds)² = (dr)² – (c dt1)² – (c dt2)² – (c dt3)² = (dr)² –  (c dt

where r is the space coordinate and t1, t2, and t3 are time coordinates of t.

Here’s how one might put together the two four-dimension spacetimes into one six-dimension spacetime invariant interval:

(ds)² = (c dt1)² + (c dt2)² + (c dt3)² – (dx1)² – (dx2)² – (dx3)² = (c dt)² – (dr

= (c dt1)² – (dx1)² + (c dt2)² – (dx2)² + (c dt3)² – (dx3

where the three dimensions of direction are the same for space and time. The six dimensions are in two groups of three dimensions, i.e., there are 2 × 3 dimensions or three complex dimensions.

Minkowski and dual Minkowski spacetime have 10 symmetries each. Six-dimension spacetime has 6 translations (one for each dimension), 6 rotations (along the x1-x2, x2-x3, x3-x1, t1-t2, t2-t3, and t3-t1 planes), and 3 Lorentz boosts (about the t1-x1, t2-x2, and t3-x3 planes) for a total of 15 symmetries.

Duals for Galilean and Lorentz transformations

In Newtonian mechanics inertial frames of reference are related by a Galilean transformation and time is absolute. In the special theory of relativity (STR) inertial frames of reference are related by a Lorentz transformation and the speed of light is absolute. By taking account of the three dimensions of time with a single dimension of space, we may derive a dual mechanics to each of these: (1) a Newtonian dual with a single dimension of absolute space and three dimensions of relative time, and (2) an STR dual with a single dimension of relative space and three dimensions of relative time.

In the usual exposition there is a reference frame S’ moving with constant velocity v in the direction of the x1 space coordinate (with no movement in the x2 and x3 directions) and absolute time t. That changes to constant argosity (inverse of velocity) w in the direction of the t1 time coordinate (with no movement in the t2 and t3 directions) and absolute space r, the distance traveled. The dual Galilean transformations are then

t1‘ = t1 – wr

t2‘ = t2

t3‘ = t3

r’ = r

What does this mean? It means that there is a constant movement measured by argosity so that as the distance increases, the duration changes from t to t1 such that t – t1‘ = wr, which is a constant ratio of duration over distance multiplied times the distance traveled.

The Lorentz transformation is analogous to this with the absolute time speed of light, c, replaced by the absolute space speed of light, which is the inverse of c, or 1/c.

t1‘ = γ (t1 – wr)

t2‘ = t2

t3‘ = t3

r’ = γ (r – t1wc²)

in which

γ = 1 / sqrt(1 – w²c²)

What does this mean? It means that time (duration) appears dilated and length (distance) appears contracted, which is the same as the standard Lorentz transformation (known as a Lorentz boost). The laws of physics remain the same despite changing to a space reference from a time reference.

Geometric vectors in physics

The concept of a vector in physics is similar to that of mathematics: a geometric object with both magnitude and direction. The magnitude is in units that may be any physical units. The direction is in angular units such as radians or degrees. These are called geometric vectors (also known as Euclidian vectors).

Note that the units for the direction are the same for all vectors. Whether a vector represents force or momentum or current density, the angular units are the same. The directional units do not depend on the units of magnitude. If an observable has magnitude and direction, the units of direction are the same as every other physical vector. What kind of physical vector it is depends on the units of magnitude, not the units of direction.

If the magnitude represents duration in a particular direction, is this a temporal magnitude with a spatial direction? No, like every other physical vector the kind of physical vector it is depends only on the units of magnitude, not on the units of direction, which are the same for all physical vectors. So a vector of duration in a particular direction is a vector of time. A vector of directional lengths or distances is a vector of space.

This is where the different senses of the word “space” can confuse us. There is space as an abstract mathematical concept, space as a directional or orientational concept, and space as a length concept. It is the sense of length or distance that distinguishes space from time in physics, with or without a direction.

There is an underlying geometry that relates to all observables and determines the meaning of “direction” in a geometric vector. In non-relativistic physics, this is an Euclidean geometry. In relativistic physics, the underlying geometry is non-Euclidean.

Speeds and velocities

A common word-problem in arithmetic goes something like this: If someone takes a road trip and for half of the time they go one speed and for the other half they go another speed, how should their average speed be determined? The answer is that the average speed is the arithmetic mean of the two speeds. It is implicitly weighted by the time each speed was driven because the denominator of speed is a unit of time.

In symbols, if the first speed is s1 and the second speed is s2, then the average speed is (s1 + s2) / 2. I call this the mean time-speed, though it is generally known as the time-mean speed since it is averaged in reference to time.

But if someone takes a road trip and for half of the distance they go one speed and for the other half they go another speed, how should their average speed be determined? The answer is that the average speed is the harmonic mean of the two speeds, because then it is weighted by the distance each speed was driven, which is in the numerator.

In symbols, if the first speed is s1 and the second speed is s2, then the average speed is 1/((1/s1 + 1/s2) / 2) = 2 / (1/s1 + 1/s2) = 2 s1 s2 / (s1 + s2). I call this the mean space-speed but it is generally known as the space-mean speed since it is averaged in reference to space.

This becomes clearer if we speak about how slow the vehicle travels rather than how fast, that is, the inverse of speed, which I call the space-speed. This measures the travel time per unit of distance. Since the denominator is now distance, the average of the space-speeds is the arithmetic mean. Inverting this results in an ordinary speed (which I call the time-speed), which equals the harmonic mean of the two speeds in the word problem.

The same procedures apply to angular speed or rotation as well. The arithmetic mean averages two different angular speeds for given time periods. The harmonic mean averages two different angular speeds for given angular distances, i.e., angles or rotations.

What about velocity instead of speed? That is, what happens if the speeds are in different directions? If someone takes a road trip and for half of the time they go one speed East and for the other half they go another speed North, their average speed is the arithmetic mean of the two speeds. But their resultant speed, that is, the magnitude of the resultant vector, is the length of the hypotenuse formed by the triangle with speeds East and North weighted by their duration and divided by the total time. It is in the direction of direct flight from the beginning point to the end point.

If someone takes a road trip and for half of the distance they go one speed East and for the other half they go another speed North, their average speed is the harmonic mean of the two speeds. But their resultant speed, that is, the magnitude of the resultant vector, is the length of the hypotenuse formed by the triangle with speeds East and North weighted by their distance and divided by the total time. It is in the direction of direct flight from the beginning point to the end point.

We can easily picture a map representing the route in space, but it is more difficult to picture a time map representing the route in time. Yet the velocities in space and the velocities in time are vectors which can each be represented on a map, that is, geometrically.

Direction and dimension

What does it mean to say that space has three dimensions? It means that space has directions that have three dimensions, that is, three degrees of freedom. The dimensions are the directions in the space.

It’s not that there are some dimensions that are spatial and others are something else but that space is characterized by a certain number of independent directions. That is why three coordinates are needed to specify locations in space.

Saying that time also has three dimensions does not mean time has three different dimensions. It means that time also has directions that have three dimensions, that is, three degrees of freedom. The dimensions of time are the directions in time.

Vectors have magnitude and direction. A position vector specifies a location in multiple dimensions. Whether that location is in time or in space depends on the units of the magnitude. If the units are length, the vector is in space. If the units are durations, the vector is in time. If the units are lengths per unit time, the vector is in spacetime. If the units are newtons, the vector is in a force field.

Vectors have directions, and directions have dimensions.

No change in time per distance

Speed can be zero, that is, the change in spatial position per unit of duration can be zero. Can the change in temporal position per unit of distance be zero, too? Let’s see.

First, the denominator cannot be zero. We cannot simply invert a zero speed because that would lead to a zero denominator, which is disallowed mathematically. The denominator is non-zero no matter what the measured quantity is.

Second, the units in the denominator are the reference for what the numerator is measured against. It’s as if the units keep ticking away while the numerator is measured. Since time is often in the denominator, the seconds, minutes, hours, etc. seem to be ticking away no matter what the value of the numerator is.

Third, in this case the distance units are in the denominator. The context is that distance units are ticking away while the duration is measured.

Here’s an example of what this means. Suppose you’re on a train going at a steady speed. The click clack of the train reminds you that it’s making distance. In your mind the click clack measures the distance away from your departure and closer to your destination.

Suppose a train comes up beside yours and goes at the same speed. You aren’t moving relative to the other train. But in units of distance what is the change in time? Since your motion is synchronized, there is no relative change in temporal position between the two trains. The relative change in time is zero, while the distance ticks off, click clack click clack.

Yes, a change in time per unit of distance can be zero.

The flow of time and space

Marcus Aurelius wrote, “Time is like a river made up of the events which happen, and a violent stream; for as soon as a thing has been seen, it is carried away, and another comes in its place, and this will be carried away too.” Time flows, and keeps flowing day and night, whether anything is happening or not.

But a river flows in space as well as time. Heraclitus is reported to have said, “No man ever steps in the same river twice”. This is because a river moves, and the water that was here is now there. The spatial position of water in a river keeps changing. Space is like a river, too.

There is a sense that time is always moving because clocks are always moving. But on the world’s roads vehicles are always moving somewhere, and odometers are always measuring distances. So in a similar sense space is always moving.

Clocks sometimes stop or are stopped intentionally. If we stop measuring time, time does not stop. The same is true with distance. If we stop measuring distance, space does not stop. We have not reached the edge of the universe.

We cannot measure time without movement so movement must have some special relation to time. But with a ruler we move our eyes from one place to another even if we don’t move the ruler. With longer distances we must move the ruler. A rolling distance measuring wheel can move indefinitely. If we measure distance with light as surveyors or astronomers do, the light moves. We cannot measure distance without movement as well.

As with duration, so with distance in a parallel manner. As with time, so with space. Time flows? So does space.