Definitions of mass and vass

The conservation of momentum states (see here):

For a system of objects, a component of the momentum (p = mv, the mass times the velocity) along a chosen direction is constant, if no net outside force with a component in this chosen direction acts on the system.

The corresponding principle for fulmentum states:

For a system of objects, a component of the fulmentum (q = nw, the vass times the lenticity) along a chosen direction is constant, if no net outside release with a component in this chosen direction acts on the system.

The momentum is equivalent to the force (ma) required to bring a body to a stop in a unit length of time. Correspondingly, the fulmentum is equivalent to the release (nb) required to bring a body to a stop in a unit length of distance.

The definition of mass as found here is

mass, in physics, quantitative measure of inertia, a fundamental property of all matter. It is, in effect, the resistance that a body of matter offers to a change in its speed or position upon the application of a force. The greater the mass of a body, the smaller the change produced by an applied force.

In other words, with constant momentum, the greater the mass, the smaller the velocity.

The corresponding definition of its inverse, vass, would then be

vass, in physics, quantitative measure of facilia, fundamental property of all matter. It is, in effect, the nonresistance that a body of matter offers to a change in its pace or position upon the application of a release. The greater the vass of a body, the larger the change produced by an applied release.

In other words, with constant fulmentum, the greater the vass, the smaller the lenticity, which means the faster the motion.