iSoul Time has three dimensions

Transportation symmetry

An experimenter turns on a device and transmits a signal from point A to point B. Two people play catch and toss a ball from one at point A to the other at point B. A truck transports its cargo from the terminal at point A to the terminal at point B. All these are cases of transportation.

Because of translational symmetry the laws of physics are invariant under any translation, that is, rectilinear change of position. But transportation is something more than translation. Motion is outgoing from one point and incoming at the other point. From the perspective of an observer at point A in the above examples, the translation is an outgoing motion. From the perspective of an observer at point B, the translation is an incoming motion.

Time-reversal symmetry (or T-symmetry) is valid in some cases but not in general, so it cannot be the same as transportation symmetry, which is valid in general, A return trip interchanges the sender and receiver but it is a different trip, and has nothing to do with reversing time.

Because of rotational symmetry the laws of physics are invariant under any rotation. If an observer is translated from point A to point B, and then rotated so they’re facing back, that is not the same as a transportation from point A to point B. The perspective must change, not merely the position.

This change of perspective is a physical change. Outgoing and incoming motions are not the same. Transmission of a signal differs from reception of a signal. Throwing a ball differs from catching a ball. Departing a truck terminal differs from arriving at a truck terminal.

But there is a symmetry between these motions. The laws of physics are invariant under a transformation from the perspective of an observer at the sending point A to the perspective of an observer at the receiving point B. This is transportation symmetry. Because of Noether’s theorem, a conservation law corresponds to transportation symmetry.

Post Navigation